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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Glenn Greenwald
Co-Founder, The Intercept
MSNBCW 07/09/2014
Greenwald: The Obama Administration has been saying for years but certainly over the last year. You need not worry, this spying is completely legal and constitutional. And yet, every time the ACLU and other groups and other people have sued to get a ruling on whether or not this really is legal and constitutional, the Obama Justice Department goes into court and raises a technicality and says they can't prove they were subjected to the spying and therefore they have no standing to actually sue because we all do it in secret and nobody can prove they were spied upon. And the courts throw the case out. The five right wing judges on the Supreme Court last year accepted the Obama DOJ argument and threw those cases out. Now these people have proof that they were subjected to the spying and I think you’re going to see lawsuits now claiming that the spying framework is in fact unconstitutional.
Jill Abramson
Former Editor of The New York Times
FOXNEWSW 07/16/2014
Abramson: I have never dealt with an administration where more officials -- some of whom are actually paid to be the spokesman for various federal agencies demand that be off the record. That's secretive and not transparent. The most serious thing is the Obama administration has launched eight criminal leak investigations against sources and whistleblowers.
Jill Abramson
Former Editor of The New York Times
FOXNEWSW 07/16/2014
Abramson: They have tried to sweep in journalists. It's almost the one year anniversary exactly that your colleague James Rosen had his record secretly looked at by the government in a leak investigation. These are really have put a freeze and have interrupted the normal flow of journalists who want to cover Washington and national security especially. Van Susteren: Is it profoundly different though than the other administrations? Abramson: It’s profoundly different. Before these cases, these eight cases in all of history there have been fewer than half of those. And so it is different.
Jill Abramson
Former Editor of The New York Times
FOXNEWSW 07/16/2014
Abramson: you know, in certain ways they have declassified some documents. They have done some things that weigh on the side of transparency. But I just think that these criminal cases, these criminal leak investigations outweigh all of the good that they have done and all of the efforts they have made to try to be transparent. You said in the lead into the show, I'm not alone in pointing out how closed and difficult this administration is for reporters. Everyone from Bob Schieffer to Lynn Downy, who was the top Editor at the Washington Post have commented on how secretive this White House is. Van Susteren: You have now just recently 38 journalist organizations protesting in a letter. You have the White House photographers who have been objecting because they don't have access.
Keith Alexander
General, Former Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
MSNBCW 07/20/2014
Mitchell: "New York Times" is reporting that your successor Admiral Michael Rogers says it really wasn't so bad (damage to National Security from the Snowden NSA leaks). The sky isn't falling. Do you want to respond to that? Alexander: Yeah, I took it a little bit different. I took what he said is it's manageable. There is change, but, look, he has to come into an agency now that is faced with all this, and he has to manage and lead them out of it. That’s what our nation wants him to do. We need an NSA. We need them ready to defend this country. He has to do it, he has to manage it. I think he would also tell you there has been great risk with what's happened, what we've lost, and just look around what's happened to our country, what's happened to all of us. It has been significant.
Jeffrey Rosen
Pres. & CEO, National Constitution Center
MSNBCW 07/20/2014
Rosen: I thought that
John Brennan
Director of the CIA
KPIX 07/31/2014
Orr: In January, the C.I.A. accused intelligence committee staffers of improperly accessing classified files while investigating the C.I.A.'s harsh interrogations of al Qaeda prisoners. Senators fired back accusing the C.I.A. of spying on the committees' investigators, an allegation C.I.A. Director John Brennan flatly denied. Brennan: As far as the allegations of, you know, C.I.A. hacking into, you know, Senate computers, nothing could be further from the truth. We wouldn't do that. I mean that's-- that's just beyond the--, you know, the scope of reason. Orr: But the C.I.A.'s own inspector general determined the agency did spy on Senate investigators. I.G. findings released today revealed five agency employees improperly accessed committee files and reviewed some of the e-mails of committee staff members.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
KPIX 07/31/2014
Orr: In addition to his apology, Brennan ordered a broader internal review. On Capitol Hill, Senate Intelligence Chair Dianne Feinstein said in a statement,
Andrea Mitchell
NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and Host of Andrea Mitchell Reports
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Mitchell: Hearing more about the so-called torture report. The Senate intelligence report years in the making that there is a draft, was incredibly e-mailed by mistake to the Associated Press from the White House. A draft which appeared to try to water down the use of the word torture and the state department had some comments about that. One of the conclusions was that Colin Powell when Secretary of State was kept pretty much in the dark in the initial planning on this policy, the enhanced interrogation techniques by the White House led by the CIA and some people in the Vice President's office. What more do we know about the evolution of this document? It's about to come out.
Michael Schmidt
Reporter, New York Times
MSNBCW 07/31/2014
Schmidt: This CIA Inspector General's report has come out that says the CIA improperly basically broke into Senate computers to see what they were -- what information they had as they were working on the torture report. And the CIA Director Brennan has gone up to the Hill and has apologized for this and a apparently had this tense meet with Dianne Feinstein earlier this week. It's interesting how much as this report comes out, it's clear the CIA was doing all this other stuff to find out what was going to be in it and what information was there. And apparently it's improper according to their Inspector General.
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